Out of the Unknown, by A.E. van Vogt and Edna Mayne Hull – April, 1948 (Roy Hunt)

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“The Sea Thing”, by A.E. van Vogt (art by Charles McNutt) – page 2.

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“The Sea Thing”, by A.E. van Vogt (art by Charles McNutt) – page 23.

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“The Wishes We Make”, by Edna Mayne Hull (art by Charles McNutt) – page 32.

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“The Wishes We Make”, by Edna Mayne Hull (art by Charles McNutt) – page 33.

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“The Witch”, by A.E. van Vogt (art by Charles McNutt) – page 56.

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“The Witch”, by A.E. van Vogt (art by Neil Austin) – page 69.

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“The Patient”, by Edna Mayne Hull (art by Charles McNutt) – page 80.

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“The Patient”, by Edna Mayne Hull (art by Charles McNutt) – page 81.

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“The Ultimate Wish”, by Edna Mayne Hull (art by Charles McNutt) – page 90.

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“The Ultimate Wish”, by Edna Mayne Hull (art by Roy Hunt) – page 103.

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“The Ghost”, by A.E. van Vogt (art by Roy Hunt) – page 108.

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“The Ghost”, by A.E. van Vogt (art by Roy Hunt) – page 115.

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The Science Fiction Hall of Fame – Volume IV, Edited by Terry Carr – 1986

Contents

Introduction, by Terry Carr

1970

“Ill Met in Lankhmar”, by Fritz Leiber
(The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, April, 1970)

“Slow Sculpture”, by Theodore Sturgeon
(Galaxy Science Fiction, February, 1970)

1971

“The Missing Man”, by Katherine MacLean
(Analog Science Fiction / Science Fact, March, 1971)

“The Queen of Air and Darkness”, by Poul Anderson
(The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, April, 1971)

“Good News from the Vatican”, by Robert Silverberg
(Universe 1, 1971)

1972

“A Meeting with Medusa”, by Arthur C. Clarke
(Playboy, December, 1971)

“Goat Song”, by Poul Anderson
(The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, February, 1972)

“When It Changed”, by Joanna Russ
(Again, Dangerous Visions, March, 1972)

1973

“The Death of Doctor Island”, by Gene Wolfe
(Universe 3, 1973)

“Of Mist, and Grass, and Sand”, by Vonda N. Mclntyre
(Analog Science Fiction / Science Fact, October, 1973)

“Love Is the Plan the Plan Is Death”, by James Tiptree, Jr.
(The Alien Condition, April, 1973)

1974

“Born with the Dead”, by Robert Silverberg
(Born with the Dead – Three Novellas About the Spirit of Man, 1974)

“If the Stars Are Gods”, by Gordon Eklund and Gregory Benford
(Universe 4, 1974)

“The Day Before the Revolution”, by Ursula K. Le Guin
(Galaxy Science Fiction, August, 1974)

The Science Fiction Hall of Fame – Volume IIB, Edited by Ben Bova – 1973

Contents

Introduction, by Ben Bova

“The Martian Way”, by Isaac Asimov
(Galaxy Science Fiction, November, 1952)

“Earthman, Come Home”, by James Blish

“Rogue Moon”, by Algis Budrys
(1960)

“The Spectre General”, by Theodore Cogswell
(Astounding Science Fiction, June, 1952)

“The Machine Stops”, by E.M. Forster
(The Oxford and Cambridge Review, November, 1909)

“The Midas Plague”, by Frederik Pohl
(Galaxy Science Fiction, April, 1954)

“The Witches of Karres”, by James H. Schmitz
(Astounding Science Fiction, December, 1949)

”E For Effort”, by T.L. Sherred
(Astounding Science Fiction, May, 1947)

“In Hiding”, by Wilmar H. Shiras
(Astounding Science Fiction, November, 1948)

“The Big Front Yard”, by Clifford D. Simak
(Astounding Science Fiction, October, 1958)

“The Moon Moth”, by Jack Vance
(Galaxy Science Fiction, August, 1961)

The Science Fiction Hall of Fame – Volume IIA, Edited by Ben Bova – 1973

Contents

Introduction, by Ben Bova

“Call Me Joe”, by Poul Anderson
(Astounding Science Fiction, April, 1957)

“Who Goes There?”, John W. Campbell, Jr (as Don A. Stuart)
(Astounding Science Fiction, August, 1938)

“Nerves”, by Lester del Rey
(Astounding Science Fiction, September, 1942)

“Universe”, by Robert A. Heinlein
(Astounding Science Fiction, May, 1941)

“The Marching Morons”, by Cyril M. Kornbluth
(Galaxy Science Fiction, April, 1951)

“Vintage Season”, by Henry Kuttner and Catherine L. Moore (as Lawrence O’Donnell)
(Astounding Science Fiction, September, 1946)

“And Then There Were None”, by Eric Frank Russell
(Astounding Science Fiction, June, 1951)

“The Ballad of Lost C’Mell”, by Cordwainer Smith
(Galaxy Science Fiction, October, 1952)

“Baby Is Three”, by Theodore Sturgeon
(Galaxy Science Fiction, October, 1952)

“The Time Machine”, by H.G. Wells
(William Heinemann, 1895)

“With Folded Hands”, by Jack Williamson
(Astounding Science Fiction, July, 1947)

The Science Fiction Hall of Fame – Volume I, Edited by Lester Del Rey – 1972

 

Contents

Introduction, by Robert Silverberg

“A Martin Odyssey”, by Stanley G. Weinbaum
(Wonder Stories, July, 1934)

“Twilight”, by John W. Campbell (as Don A. Stuart)
(Astounding Stories, November, 1934)

“Helen O’Loy”, by Lester del Rey
(Astounding Science Fiction, December, 1938)

“The Roads Must Roll”, by Robert A. Heinlein
(Astounding Science Fiction, June, 1940)

“Microcosmic God”, by Theodore Sturgeon
(Astounding Science Fiction, April, 1941)

“Nightfall”, by Isaac Asimov
(Astounding Science Fiction, September, 1941)

“The Weapon Shop”, by A.E. van Vogt
(Astounding Science Fiction, December, 1942)

“Mimsy Were the Borogoves”, by Lewis Padgett
(Astounding Science Fiction, February, 1943)

“Huddling Place”, by Clifford D. Simak
(Astounding Science Fiction, July, 1944)

“Arena”, by Fredric Brown
(Astounding Science Fiction, June, 1944)

“First Contact”, by Murray Leinster
(Astounding Science Fiction, November, 1945)

“That Only A Mother”, by Judith Merril
(Astounding Science Fiction, June, 1948)

“Scanners Live in Vain, by Cordwainer Smith
(Fantasy Book, January, 1950)

“Mars is Heaven!”, by Ray Bradbury
(Planet Stories, Fall, 1948)

“The Little Black Bag”, by Cyril M. Kornbluth
(Astounding Science Fiction, July, 1950)

“Born of Man and Woman”, by Richard Matheson
(The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, July, 1950)

“Coming Attraction”, by Fritz Leiber
(Galaxy Science Fiction, November, 1950)

“The Quest for Saint Aquin”, by Anthony Boucher
(New Tales of Space and Time, 1951)

“Surface Tension”, by James Blish
(Galaxy Science Fiction, August, 1952)

“The Nine Billion Names of God”, by Arthur C. Clarke
(Star Science Fiction Stories Number 1, 1953)

“It’s A Good Life”, by Jerome Bixby
(Star Science Fiction Stories Number 2, 1953)

“The Cold Equations”, by Tom Godwin
(Astounding Science Fiction, August, 1954)

“Fondly Fahrenheit”, by Alfred Bester
(The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, August, 1954)

“The Country of The Kind”, by Damon Knight
(The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, February, 1956)

“Flowers for Algernon”, by Daniel Keyes
(The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, April, 1959)

“A Rose for Ecclesiastes”, by Roger Zelazny
(The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, November, 1963)

The Blue Valleys – A Collection of Stories, by Robert Morgan – 1989 (Lisa Lytton-Smith)

Lorna had never understood the sharpness of her tongue.

It was a habit she had developed as a teenager,
and it had grown on her over the years.

She did not realize how she sounded.

He thought of recording her on tape and then playing it back to her.

She would be astonished at the harshness in her voice,
at the belittling tone of her comments.

Shew knew how to be polite in public, and with her friends from church.

It was only with him, and with her sisters, that side of her came out.

But she was mostly a good woman,
though he had not meant to spend his life with her.

That was why he seemed so tolerant, why he almost never quarreled.

If he let himself go who knows what he would end up saying.

He might let it out that he had never wanted to marry her,
never wanted to be with her.

It would tear away whatever grace their life had had,
pull down the scaffold and show how badly fitted and supported they really were.

It would ruin her opinion and pride in herself.

His very lack of feeling for her had been the essence of his devotion and patience,
which so many friends had praised,
especially at the times when other friends had divorced.

– “Tailgunner“, by Robert Morgan